FRIENDS OF THE KAW TEAMS UP WITH GOOD RIVER BEER FOR CONSERVATION

FRIENDS OF THE KAW TEAMS UP WITH GOOD RIVER BEER FOR CONSERVATION


Good River Beer
 Expands Distribution to Kansas: Raising 2% for Rivers

(Denver, CO – DATE EST SEPT 28TH) Good River Beer has partnered with Standard Beverage to expand distribution to Kansas and support local conservation efforts. Beginning next week, Good River Beer’s collection of premium craft beers will hit shelves in select retailers, starting with Whole Foods and Balls Food Stores.

Good River Beer is dedicated to brewing quality craft beer while forwarding their mission “to protect and conserve rivers.” As part of their expansion, they’ve teamed up with a Kansas-based nonprofit, Friends of the Kaw, to amplify their effort in uniting the river community around conservation. 2% of Good River Beer proceeds will be donated to the organization to protect the Kansas River, the state’s most prominent river for recreation, and a drinking source to nearly 1 million residents.

“We founded Good River Beer with the intent to build a company that makes a positive impact on the world,” says Co-Founder, Adam Odoski. “Beer is the vehicle to make that happen. The more beer we sell, the more we can give back to rivers and surrounding communities. Friends of the Kaw does some incredible work, and I’m excited to see the impact we can make.”

Executive Director Dawn Buehler is equally excited about the partnership opportunity adding, “We love partners who advocate for clean water and are proud to collaborate with Good River Beer on a chance to protect the Kansas River. There is nothing more important than protecting this waterway as it provides drinking water to over 800,000 Kansans, is a source of recreation, and a home to all that live in and along its shores.”

Good River Beer fans in Kansas can expect to find their full lineup across the state including, Hey Fishy Fishy, a juicy, aromatic, Hazy IPA; Class V (5), a big, bold, and balanced double IPA; American, a clean and crisp Pilsner, Fu Fighter, a gold-medal-winning Belgian Style Golden Ale; Horsethief, an easy-drinking, well-balanced, and malt-oriented, Mango Blonde Ale; and a Variety 12-Pack.

Good River Beer will be available on shelves beginning early-October 2020 with launch events and river-cleanups taking place in the Spring of 2021. Visit goodriverbeer.com to learn more about Good River Beer and stay updated on the latest company news.

About Good River Beer:

Good River Beer is a Colorado-based craft brewery with a purpose-driven mission to share their beer, follow the adventure, and protect and conserve rivers. They brew traditional beers crafted to cover the spectrum of flavor, with unique elements to classic recipes. All of their beer styles are named after rivers or river themes. Styles range from easy-drinking Ales, perfect for a lazy float, to big hoppy IPA’s to enjoy fireside after running a spicy section of Class V rapids. And, they just won their first Great American Beer Fest Gold Medal in 2019.

For more information about Good River Beer, please visit goodriverbeer.com

For more information about 2% For Rivers, a nonprofit founded by Good River Beer, please visit twopercentforrivers.com

About Friends of the Kaw:

Friends of the Kaw is the only 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization dedicated to protecting and preserving the Kansas River. Our mission is to advocate, promote, educate, and engage the Kansas River.

Friends of the Kaw supports the Kansas Riverkeeper®, a non-governmental public advocate who holds the community accountable for the health of the Kansas River. The Kansas Riverkeeper is the eyes, ears, and voice of the Kansas River acting in the capacity of a leader, educator, investigator, media spokesperson, and scientist.

Some of our programs include river cleanups, educational paddle trips, ecosystem restoration, and our Kids About Water (KAWS) K-12 education program. To learn more about Friends of the Kaw, please visit www.kansasriver.org. Protect. Advocate. Discover.

Chasing the Channel Blog

Advocacy…at the heart of what we do.

Fall is a spectacular time on the Kaw. If you’ve experienced it, you know what I’m talking about. This is also an incredibly busy time of the year for us at Friends of the Kaw, but who am I kidding, it is busy all year long. The river never takes a break from needing to be protected. That said, the fall is a great time to help people connect to the Kansas River and we have had a busy month doing just that.

Eudora Community Paddle on the Kaw
Photo by Dawn Buehler

We normally have wait lists for our events, but this year has been unlike any other. I think with the pressures of the COVID pandemic, people are looking for ways to spend their time outdoors and find new ways to explore. We held a Pop-Up Paddle, two Beginner’s Paddle Events and a Community Paddle at Eudora in the last month and every one of them had a wait list. One of them had 95 people on the wait list…let me say that again, 95 people. I think this speaks not to necessarily the popularity of Friends of the Kaw, but more to the place we are in as a world in the middle of a pandemic. We all need connection – with each other and with nature – and paddling on a river is one way to do that! We have a few more events coming up this fall and we hope you can join us and experience the beauty of Kansas only seen from the Kansas River.

Kansas River sandbar art.
Photo by Dawn Buehler

I’ve been busy with my many advocacy related activities and boards where I represent the Kansas River in my role as Kansas Riverkeeper. I am on the Stakeholder Leadership Team for the Lower Kansas WRAPS (Water Restoration and Protection Strategy) and I’m happy to report that the group is gaining ground on delisting Stranger Creek for bacteria. We aren’t there yet, but this group is making great progress with cover crops and alternate watering systems to keep cattle out of the waterways. You can learn more about this work from our friends at Kansas Alliance for Wetlands and Streams here: https://kaws.org/ourwork/watersheds/lkr/.

I also Chair the Kansas Regional Advisory Committee for the Kansas Water Vision. We recently updated our goals and action plans for the Kansas River basin and presented them to the Kansas Water Authority. I have worked on this committee for 5 years and it is by far some of the most impactful work that I do in terms of finding ways to protect our water quality and quantity. I will write more about our work on this committee in the new year but for now you can read up on the state’s Water Vision here: https://kwo.ks.gov/water-vision-water-plan/water-vision.

What a full month of advocacy! Another project where we represent the river is on the Sustainable Rivers Program. This is a partnership between The Nature Conservancy and the Corps of Engineers to reoperate Corps dams to find more ecological flows while still meeting downstream needs. We had a two day online call to do a workshop on this program. I am happy to say that this program has the greatest opportunity to have long term benefits to the Kansas River ecosystem! You can learn more about this program here: https://www.nature.org/en-us/what-we-do/our-priorities/protect-water-and-land/land-and-water-stories/sustainable-rivers-project/. Friends of the Kaw is on the Steering Committee for this program and proud to be a part of it!

Sandbars are back on the Kansas River!
Photo by Dawn Buehler

On top of all of those advocacy activities this month, we still find violations on the Kansas River. I have numerous violations that are being reported – from new dump sites to dredge cables that are left up, to discharges that look suspicious. Join us in keeping an eye on the river and if you see anything suspicious, you can report it directly to Kansas Department of Health and Environment, but please also contact us so that we can keep the pressure on to get it cleaned up. You can email riverkeeper@kansasriver.org. We are all in this together!

As always, if we can help you connect to the Kansas River, you know where to find us. Email, call, social media – or simply find us on the river. We are always happy to help.

May you always have sand in your shoes….

For the river,
Dawn, Your Kansas Riverkeeper

Somebody has to do it….

Somebody has to do it….

These last couple of weeks have felt less like a sweltering Kansas August and more like the onset of fall. I don’t let it fool me…I’ve lived in Kansas my whole life and know well enough that we are not done with 90 degree days! I am a child of summer, so I’m always hoping for summer to hang on a little while longer. Every season holds something special here in Kansas…because we truly get 4 seasons. For me, the best season on the Kaw is fall. Oh, beautiful fall! There is something quite spectacular about starting the day with a light jacket as you slowly push off onto the cool air of the river. By mid morning, you are taking layers off and feeling the warmth of the sun. But the evening….the evening is where the Kaw showcases the magic. A Kansas River sandbar on a cool evening with a campfire, friends, stories and then a peaceful rest in the coolness of the river’s edge. Those are the days of magic, friends.

Last weekend, the river finally dropped as the Corps of Engineers dropped the outflows at Milford as it got closer to conservation pool. Those of us that are on the Kaw regularly know where all of the big trash resides and we know that it is our duty to get it off the river. So with a team of our Kaw River Guides, we made a last minute decision to get on the river at Ogden and go after a few big ticket items that we’ve been eager to get off of our beautiful river. So off we went…with chainsaws, contractor trash bags, gloves, and a lot of determination.

Shoveling mud at the Ogden Boat Ramp

Our first job of the day was to shovel the Ogden Boat Ramp – by hand! The river has dropped, so often the communities have not had a chance to clean it. We try to always carry a shovel for this reason and thankfully we had one and blazed a path through the deep and thick muck. We shoved off with plans to get a hot tub just downstream of the Ogden ramp and we were hoping it was still there. And…yes, it was. And it was encased in mud and even had grass growing around it. We found an eddy on the backside to steady our boats and went to work with a chainsaw. We were able to remove about half of the hot tub and the rest will have to wait until the river drops significantly, but we will be back for it! We had made last minute arrangements with a Game Warden that we’ve worked with before to come and help us get all of the trash off the river, so we stacked all of the debris on a sandbar to wait for our return the next day.

Empty septic tank on an island in the river.

We headed on to our sandbar for our overnight stay, with plans to get what we really coveted to get off the river – a septic tank that has been on an island for the better part of 2 years. When we arrived at our sandbar for the night, there we found a water heater and some tire rims, so all of us together used our tie down straps to make a sling so that we could carry the water heater to the water’s edge and make sure it would be easy for the Game Warden to retrieve.

More items found on our sandbar for the night!

We enjoyed one of those spectacular Kaw evenings on the sandbar. We had a fire, friendship, and we laughed at stories from the KAW 173. One of our many jokes is that if there is a chance that rain will find us, it will! And we could not believe that with a zero percent chance of rain, we woke at 6:00 AM to the sound of thunder! Ahh….we are so use to it, that we got up and made coffee and then hunkered back down in our tents to let it pass. We had big plans ahead for the septic tank but we were in no hurry. We were getting that septic tank!

Kaw sandbar fire!

We shoved off later that morning and we only had about a mile to go to reach the island with the septic tank. We knew the island was a very muddy spot and did not have a lot of sand and it had just rained, so this was going to be a mess. It is amazing what you get use to when you spend a lot of time in rivers.

Thank you to Game Warden Gehrt with Kansas Dept. of Wildlife Parks & Tourism for transporting all of our trash off the river!

The septic tank was there, perched high above the island and surrounded mostly by driftwood. With our handy chainsaw and some skilled Kaw River Guides, we dismantled the septic tank into pieces and stacked it up for the Game Warden’s arrival. Not long after finishing our work, Game Warden Gehrt with Kansas Dept. of Wildlife Parks & Tourism arrived! We loaded all of the plastic from the septic tank and also loaded two of our Kaw River Guides to go along and help with unloading and then also loading the rest of our trash haul. Everything was transported to the Fairmont Park boat ramp in Manhattan and the next day it was taken to the landfill by the Riley Co. Parks Department! Talk about teamwork…that’s how things get done!

Our trash haul at the Fairmont Park boat ramp in Manhattan. The next day, Riley Co. Parks & Recreation came and took it all to the landfill, thank you so much!

Friends of the Kaw has been the only non-profit dedicated to cleaning up the Kaw for almost three decades. I am proud to carry on the work of those before me. What makes this all happen though, is a team of dedicated volunteers and partners all up and down the river. We can all cleanup up the Kaw together – one cleanup day at a time. Somebody has to do it, why not us?

Anyone can join us a Kaw River Guide if you have your own boat and gear, just reach out and get involved. Even if you don’t have a boat, but want to join us, we have bank cleanups too. It doesn’t matter if you can give one hour, or every weekend…we are grateful for any gift of your time. Contact me and I will be happy to get you included in our communications.

I hope that I say enough how grateful I am to our volunteers and partners – you all know that we could not do all that we do without them, right? What a great group of people we have that are committed to this journey with us. Every day I get up and love my job…but these folks make it so much easier!

The Kaw is looking spectacular this weekend…the river is dropping and the sandbars are emerging. The weather looks perfect! Let me know if I can help you connect to the Kansas River . Call or email with questions about flows, ramps, sections, camping – whatever it is, we want to help you find your own adventure on the Kaw! PS…don’t forget your lifejacket!

May you always have sand in your shoes…

For the river,

Dawn, Your Kansas Riverkeeper

Reflections on Chasing the 173-Mile-Long Channel

Reflections on Chasing the 173-Mile-Long Channel

Photo by Lisa Grossman

When we arrived at beautiful Kaw Point Park in Kansas City, there were so many emotions. I was thankful that we all made it, thankful that everyone was healthy, thankful that my own body completed the tasks, and thankful for 9 days of memories that will see me through the coldest days of winter.

I was also very grateful and overjoyed to see so many people at Kaw Point Park. This beautiful park only became a park thanks to the efforts of a non-profit (Friends of Kaw Point Park), started by our very own Mike Calwell, and a board of dedicated river lovers. Mike would have loved our arrival at Kaw Point.

We were greeted by many of our long time members, staff and board members, but the one that made my heart so happy was to see former Kansas Riverkeeper, Laura Calwell, there to greet us. She worked long and hard for the Kansas River for so many years. She has continued to support our work and continued, to this day, to be a mentor to me in our work for the Kansas River.

Photo by David Sain
Eagle tracks, dragging a carp. One of our daily investigations on the sandbar!

If I was to be totally honest here, I was not ready to get off the river. I enjoyed the peacefulness of no news and the absolute bonding of friendships that occurred on our journey. I did not want to leave the sandbar fire talks, the investigation each evening of animal tracks, the laughter, the sharing of joy and frustration, sleeping in my little tent with everything I need tucked inside, paddling along the banks of the Kaw and observing wildlife peacefully living in their home, and the absolute freedom of paddling a river and going wherever you want. No, I did not want to leave…but I did miss my husband, family and my labrador retrievers. My husband and I joke that it’s really about the dogs! But I’m truthfully ready to go back and get lost in the peacefulness of the Kaw once again.

I enjoyed every minute of the KAW 173….and I hope that you did too. Thank you for following along. Our hope is that you saw the beauty and that you saw that the river is more you ever imagined. We hope you saw that there are still wild spaces in Kansas and most of you drive over it every day. We hope that you will plan your own adventure on the Kansas River – and we hope you give us a call or send an email – and let us know how we can help you connect to the Kansas River. Our tag line is…protect, advocate, discover…and that’s what we hope you do too.

Thanks for following along…join me sometime to “Chase the Channel”…until then, I’ll be on the river.

For the river,

Dawn Buehler

Kansas Riverkeeper & Executive Director

The MERC Co+Op Change Program Recipient

The MERC Co+Op Change Program Recipient


Friends….we have been selected as The MERC Co+Op Change for our Community Recipient for August 2020!  Please join us to shop at The MERC Co+Op located at 901 Iowa St, Lawrence, KS 66044 during the month of August (and all year long!) and round up to donate to Friends of the Kaw!

During the month of August, we will highlight the “Kansas River and Food Connection” with a 3 part series.  Learn about “Agriculture along the Kansas River”, “Drinking Water and the Kansas River” and “”Ways to Protect the Kansas River”.  Stop by our table and learn more about these connections to our river.  We will be at The MERC, outside at a table, during the month of August :

Every Wednesday from 4:00 to 6:00 PM
Every Saturday from 9:00 to 11:00 AM! 

Come learn about the Kansas River, our work to protect it, and how you can get involved.  

We are so grateful for this opportunity…so please join us to thank the fine folks at The Merc when you drop in, for their efforts to help us protect the Kansas River!  Learn more about The MERC Change for our Community Program here:  https://www.themerc.coop/change

See you there!  

KAW 173 – Day 9

KAW 173 – Day 9

River Mile 19 and kayaked 19 miles to River Mile 0 on the Kansas River Water Trail.

I woke early and couldn’t sleep. I think the anticipation of the day ahead kept my mind from settling down. We had stayed on a beautiful, big sandbar with trees and the morning sounds were amazing as we were also greeted with a gorgeous sunrise that blanketed the sky.


Today was going to be epic, at least for the 7 of us. We spent a lot of time planning, discussing, and preparing our mind and bodies for this trip. Everyone on this team is between the ages of 40 and 62. I think one of the best stories of this trip is that we all made it and so can you. You don’t have to be 20, you can do it at any age if you prepare and have a good mindset. It helps to have great teammates too.

I know that when I reflect on this journey in the future, I will remember how strong I felt, how determined, and how proud I am of myself and my river friends. We did it. We kayaked all 173 miles of the Kansas River Water Trail!

I need to thank my teammates. They pushed me, themselves and each others when we needed it. They put up with my incessant planning and organizing and drive to not miss an opportunity for advocacy and awareness. They participated in the public events like champs and dealt with all of my nit picky details. All of us have our quirks and I’m thankful they put up with mine!


We would not have had such a successful outreach, media campaign, food stops and execution of our plan if it wasn’t for our Program Manager, Kim Bellemere. She not only went above and beyond every single day, but she did it with a smile. Thank you to her husband for cleaning the mud on the Topeka boat ramp when no one else did and for helping nightly with gear and water checks.

Thanks to the FOK Board, for always supporting my crazy ideas. And to Marcia for being the glue stick and my soul sister. To Lisa, you make it all easy.


Last and certainly not least, to my husband Dennis, that does absolutely everything that I ask. You are my heart.

KAW 173 Team ❤️

To “Steady, My Favorite, Mr. Gadget, Sugar Cookie, Sherpa and my Soul Sister”…you have my eternal gratitude and love.


With love for my friends and the Kansas River,


Dawn, Your Kansas Riverkeeper

KAW 173 – Day 8

KAW 173 – Day 8


River Mile 43 and kayaked 24 miles to River Mile 19 on the Kansas River Water Trail.

When dawn broke this morning, we all agreed we really had the best night of sleep of the entire trip. The temperatures last night were a cool 71° and I think we were all so tired we just passed out. We did have a great evening on the sandbar, with a bonfire and my friends brought sparklers to celebrate my birthday! We stayed up a little later than normal and stared at the stars. Lisa had brought along a pair of binoculars and we used those to enjoy the stars. Along the way we’ve all learned so much from each other….from the ones that know birding the best, from the entomologist, about sandbar tracks, and about the stars in the sky!


We departed a little later than normal, because we had come far enough the night before that we didn’t have very far to go to meet up with the Eudora Paddle group. So we enjoyed a little longer to linger around a morning campfire and breakfast. We took our time getting our things together knowing it was the second to last morning of our journey.

We got on the river a little after 9 AM and paddled downstream just a few miles to Eudora, my current home. We waited on a sandbar because we knew a lot of folks were coming. The Dirty Girls Adventure group did a fundraiser to join us for the KAW 173. About 30 of their friends came along, and the money that they paid for the trip was donated to Friends of the Kaw! We stopped on a sandbar about halfway between Eudora and De Soto and they presented us with a check for $1600! We are so grateful for this donation to our work to protect and preserves the 173-mile-long Kansas River! We love our River partners!

We had to leave the sandbar and get going onto our next community visit at De Soto. We took off and everyone else stayed back and enjoyed the sandbar, which is exactly what we want! We paddled on to De Soto, and when we arrived we were greeted by the De Soto Rotary Club. The De Soto Rotary Club has a special relationship with us… They have funded our Kids About Water Program over the years, we’ve partnered with them on the pop-up Paddle at Lexington Lake, which is coming up in August, and they also have adopted the De Soto boat ramp in our Adopt-A-Boat Ramp program. We are so blessed to have such a great river partner in the city and the Rotary. When we arrived, they had set up a tent in the shade with tables and chairs… and tons of food! We were treated to pizza from KJ‘s in De Soto as well as fresh salads and fruit! I think they knew exactly what to feed us when we got off the river because it was perfect! The Mayor of De Soto joined us and talked about the river and the relationship to the city. We really appreciate all of the people that came out today to greet us and to show how much they appreciate the river trail! We stayed for a while and lingered, it was such a great place to stop there at the park. But soon we knew that we needed to get on down the river. Thank you to my hometown for the warm welcome!

We had a community Paddle scheduled from De Soto to Cedar Creek and we needed to get going. We took off from there and enjoyed the spectacular scenery. So many bald eagles that there are too many for us to count. We also saw beavers today and once we got to the sandbar for the night, we found signs of a big turtle that had been on the sandbar! The wildlife that we see, that we witness, and that we find signs of, is the best part of the journey for me.

I’m sitting here on this sandbar (above) looking out over the river, just west of Bonner Springs. We found a beautiful spot under a shade tree and are enjoying each other’s company. I wasn’t sure how I’d feel when I got to Day 8. I honestly worried that I would be physically exhausted, or that I would have an injury such as tendinitis. These are the things that kept me working out all winter to make sure that I kept myself healthy. What I’ve learned, on Day 8… is that I’m stronger than I ever thought I was. Both mentally and physically. Because it takes both to do this. You have to stay mentally strong to make it 173 miles in a kayak with thunderstorms, rain, heat warnings, wind, and the elements. And you always, always, have sand in your shoes.

When I think about the six people that gave up their vacation to come with me on this crazy journey, it brings me to tears. They are all good people. Some of the best that I know. Good hearted, strong, the kind of people that will do anything for you. There’s no better group to go through this with, I found that is true. We’ve all become stronger together and I am incredibly grateful for this day, for this journey, and for these people. We are all a bit sad that this is the last night…the river time has been good to us.


19 miles to go. We’ve got this,… I’ve got this. I’ll see you at Kaw Point!…and may you always have sand in your shoes .


Dawn, Your Kansas Riverkeeper

KAW 173 – Day 7

KAW 173 – Day 7

River Mile 67 and kayaked 24 miles to River Mile 43 on the Kansas River Water Trail.


We woke up this morning at Beaver Hollow about 4 miles upstream from Lecompton. When we went to bed the night before, it was muggy and hot and the mosquitoes were in full force. Somewhere in the middle of the night things cooled off and this morning was perfectly beautiful. We affectionately call this spot Beaver Hollow because we’ve stayed here before, and there is great beaver activity. All night long, you can hear the splashing in the water. And in the morning you can see that they’ve been there.


We knew we had an early morning, because we had scheduled an early morning public paddle. So we were all up before the sun and on the river by 7 AM. The paddle in the early morning as some of the most perfect times on the Kansas River. The river is still, often there’s mist and the sun is slowly rising. This is the time of the day that you can see the most wildlife activity if you quietly paddle along the banks. We’ve seen so many beavers that we’ve lost track of the count. This morning was no different between beavers and deer… what a glorious place we live in!


We paddled just a few miles before we reached Lecompton and met a great group of people for a public paddle. It was great to see so many of our friends and members, what a wonderful way to come into this part of the watershed and to see the folks that really helped us make this organization what it is today. It was great to see so many friends. We departed and headed towards Lawrence, with a quick stop on the sandbar to cool off. We went ahead and left and some folks stayed back and enjoyed the river for a little while longer. When we arrived at Riverfront Park in Lawrence, we had arranged for a group of our volunteers to come and help us unload all of our gear so that we could portage our boats empty through Bowersock dam. We got back on the river after unloading, and paddled another 2 miles to Bowersock portage. This portage was put in by Bowersock Power and Mill Company and we are so grateful. And it addition to that, Sarah and her crew at Bowersock all came and met us at the portage and helped us get all of our boats to the other side. It’s great to have so many wonderful partners up and down the river. I think one of the things that’s really made me proud and happy about this experience is all of the help along the way. We have so many people that love the river and so many people that want to help and make it so much sweeter.


After portaging the dam, we paddled another 2 miles down to 8th Street boat ramp. When we arrived, there was a great group of people there to meet us including two city commissioners, folks from the Kansas Water Office and the Chair of the Kansas Water Authority. These are people that we have worked with regularly on connections to the city and on solutions to water issues. I can’t tell you how much it meant to me to have the support of all of these people that we’ve worked with over the years. We talked about Lawrence and the connection to the Kansas River Water Trail and about future projects below Bowersock that can give even more opportunity for Kansans to enjoy their river.
It has been an incredibly busy day with lots of community visits and interaction.

Special visits from my parents and in-laws as today was my 52nd birthday. What a great way to spend it…and I’m so grateful that I am physically able to do this journey!

Once we got done at 8th Street with the community visit, we all needed some time to rearrange our gear and get loaded up with water for the next leg of the journey. We spent some time getting settled and we also enjoyed lunch courtesy of Free State Brewing Company in Lawrence! We have been so spoiled on this journey but we are so grateful for all of the local connections to the water trail. Next time you’re in Lawrence… you can get off the river and simply walk over the bridge and go to Free State and have a beer and dinner. And this is really at the heart of this entire advocacy for the river trail. How are these communities connected to the Kansas River? Do people just simply drive over the bridge and never think about the connection? We are trying to highlight that you can enjoy the river trail, and stop in these communities along the way and enjoy the local flavors. There are so many wonderful things and all of these little river towns that people often don’t even know about. If you love to kayak, canoe, paddle board, fish, boat, or whatever you can think of to enjoy the river trail…there is a town along the way that can also offer wonderful places to stay along the way and great food to eat to refuel.

Friends of the Kaw started in the basement of a house in North Lawrence and this is our home. It was great to bring the water trail journey back to Lawrence. Thank you to all the people that joined us for the public paddle, the community visit, and just to cheer us on! We are grateful to everyone who has joined us on this journey.

On the note of wildlife, today was spectacular. In between all of this visiting, we did see tons of wildlife. We saw at least seven Bald eagle‘s between Lawrence and our camp spot west of Eudora. Of course we’re not sure if it’s the same bald eagle or different ones, but we spotted them seven times. We also found lots of tracks on the sandbar, and many birds including red headed woodpeckers, indigo buntings, and cuckoo. Early this morning as we paddled towards Lecompton, we saw a deer run across the river and another deer off in the distance.


There is never a shortage of wildlife on the Kansas River. This is their home and we’re just dropping in for a visit.

Tonight, we’ve settled in at the sandbar just near Eudora. Tomorrow we will do a public Paddle from Eudora to De Soto and again from De Soto to Cedar Creek. We also have a Community visit at De Soto, which is my hometown. I was born and raised on the banks of the Kansas River in De Soto and graduated from De Soto High and I’m proud to say that I am forever a Wildcat! I look forward to seeing you all in my hometown tomorrow!


Dawn, Your Kansas Riverkeeper

KAW 173 – Day 6

KAW 173 – Day 6


River Mile 92 and kayaked 25 miles to River Mile 67 on the Kansas River Water Trail.

We departed the cabin early this morning. We knew this was a big day with a community visit in Topeka and we wanted to be on the river early and be well prepared. We had spent the night before discussing all of our strategies for portaging Topeka and making it past the diversion wall at Tecumseh. We knew we had a big day ahead, as we were planning on a 25 mile track. Today was a busy day on the river.


When we left the cabin, there was a fine fog all across the river valley. Spectacular colors bouncing off the sky, colors of pink in between the sun shining through the fog. It looks like mist rising off the river. We enjoyed a very beautiful and slow paddle into Kaw River State Park where we would meet with Secretary Loveless of Kansas Department of Wildlife Parks and Tourism, as well as Dr. Ted Daughty, the husband of Governor Kelly.


We were so surprised to see so many of you at the boat ramp in Topeka. What a wonderful way to arrive, with all of you there on the boat ramp cheering us on! I cannot begin to tell you how much it meant to everyone on our team. We have two people on our team that hail from Topeka and I think it was really wonderful for them to see such a great showing from their hometown.

We enjoyed a few minutes there, discussing the water trail and talking to local media. But the real fun was paddling down to the Topeka weir with Secretary Loveless and Dr. Daughety.
When we arrived at the Topeka weir, we were once again greeted by a great group. Many of our volunteers came to help us unload our kayaks and port them. We also had friends that brought us food from a local Topeka eatery, which includes wonderful breakfast burritos that were bigger than you could ever imagine! Along with our friends, we got settled and we’re ready to takeoff once again.

The biggest challenge on the river remained ahead. There is a diversion wall at Tecumseh that has been in the river since the 1920s due to a power plant that is owned by Evergy. The plant has recently been decommissioned, but the wall remains. It is a challenging area not only due to the wall, but there is also a granite bar, boulders in the river and a lime stone ledge. Between all of these forces in the water, it can be difficult at any water level. It takes a little bit of skill to figure out the best route and it’s an area that we constantly advocate for change. We all celebrated when we made it past this point in the river, because from here it is pretty much smooth sailing. We still need to port Bowersock in Lawrence, but we have many friends that will be waiting for us to help. There is also one more portage it in Johnson County, but again it’s not a difficult one.

We made it to our favorite sandbar, just upstream of Lecompton. We have affectionately called the sandbar Beaver Hollow. This is one of the best little hidden gems on the river. Tons of wildlife, a great little sandbar tucked away on the backside of an island, shade for sitting, and plenty of room for our tents.


We are all grateful to be back on the sandbar and on the river. I’m pretty certain each of us will sleep well tonight. Tomorrow, we will meet you all at Lecompton for a paddle to Lawrence. We look forward to also having a community visit in Lawrence at the 8th Street boat ramp. I hope you all can join us, can’t wait to see you on the river!


For the river,

Dawn, Your Kansas Riverkeeper

KAW 173 – Day 5

KAW 173 – Day 5

River Mile 92 on the Kansas River Water Trail Day off river due to high flows.

We woke up refreshed this morning at Sach’s cabin. We made a big pot of coffee, sat on the front porch and watched it rain and rain and rain. We were really thankful that we were able to stay in the cabin. We spent our morning discussing logistics for the rest of the trip, looking at hydrographs of the river flows, looking at weather forecasts and strategizing for the next half of the river. A couple of folks in the group fixed breakfast and what a feast! All with food that was provided by the owners of the cabin, just for us. We enjoyed bacon, scrambled eggs, cinnamon rolls, hashbrowns, juice and coffee! We truly didn’t feel like we deserved all that but are very thankful.


Here along the river in Silver Lake, it rained until early afternoon. A few people took time to go for a long walk, others read a book, some took a nap, we organized gear… but most of us spent time figuring out how to get all of our gear dry. Finally, the sun came out and we found all the sunny spots we could find to lay everything out. I think we can say that by the end of the day everything is dry… for the moment!


This evening we have enjoyed each other’s company on the porch again. We feel like we are prepared for the second half of the trip. We even made a few adjustments to our gear and our plans for then next three portages as well as well as the Tecumseh diversion wall. Late this afternoon in the sun, we also got out our rescue ropes and practiced our throwing skills. It’s never a bad idea to practice those techniques.

We feel rested, and ready for the next half of the journey. We are so very grateful to the Sach family for the roof over our head for two nights, all of the food that they provided, and their sincere hospitality. Do us a favor and look up Kaw River Adventures and send them some Facebook Love!

We are on to Kaw State Park tomorrow morning for our community visit. We will be greeted by Secretary Loveless of Kansas Department of Wildlife Parks and Tourism, as well as potentially Governor Kelly for a brief part of the tour. We are delighted that all of these people see the value of the Kansas River Water Trail. We will be there at 8:30 AM tomorrow, we hope to see you there!

For the river,

Dawn, Your Kansas Riverkeeper